Tag Archives: USA

The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography at MIT Museum (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

The MIT Museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts is one of the best places in the world to see holograms. Most of what they have (including works from the New York Museum of Holography before it closed) is not on view. What you see on exhibit though makes you wish for an entire museum again!

Over 20 holograms created by international artists, as well as several from the MIT Museum collections, will be on display in the MIT Museum’s holography gallery.

The exhibition presents a rare opportunity to view selected works from the world-wide community of practicing display holographers. The MIT Museum holds the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of holograms and regularly invites artists to showcase new work at the Museum.

http://web.mit.edu/museum/exhibitions/holography.html

http://web.mit.edu/museum/collections/holography.html

Eric Staller’s SpiroGyrate in Terminal 3 at San Francisco Airport (SFO)

Commissioned by the San Francisco Arts Commission, SpiroGyrate is an interactive children’s play area in Terminal 3 of San Francisco International Airport.

Twelve 56″ (142 cm) spirals mesh and seemingly propel one another like so many gears, in an installation that begins on the floor and moves up the wall. Each of these spirals is laser-cut acrylic and each of them is motorized to move clockwise and counter-clockwise in a slow and hypnotic fashion. The piece is interactive, beginning with the viewer’s ability to walk and stand on the spirals, which are under heavy glass plates. Motion sensors respond to people walking over the glass circles and activate color changes in the back-lit spirals.

Fabrication: Rocket Science;interactivity consultant: Tobias Grosse-Puppendahl, Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD

http://ericstaller.com/commissioned%20work/SPIROGYRATE/

Sweepers Clock by Maarten Baas (San Francisco)

Is on display at The Exploratorium in San Francisco, California.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/arts/works/sweepers-clock

Maarten Baas combines theater, art, film, and design in Sweeper’s Clock to make a 12-hour-long movie in which two performers replicate an analog clock by sweeping two piles of garbage (one for the hour hand, one for the minute hand) to indicate the time.

http://www.maartenbaas.com/

Sweeper Clock by Maarten Baas from Dezeen on Vimeo.

Maillardet’s Automaton 1800 “Draughtsman-Writer” (Philadelphia)

It is currently on display at The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It’s too fragile to operate so videos near the exhibit show it in action.

https://www.fi.edu/history-automaton

This Automaton, known as the “Draughtsman-Writer” was built by Henri Maillardet, a Swiss mechanician of the 18th century who worked in London producing clocks and other mechanisms. It is believed that Maillardet built this extraordinary Automaton around 1800 and it has the largest “memory” of any such machine ever constructed—four drawings and three poems (two in French and one in English).

Automata, such as Maillardet’s Automaton, demonstrated mankind’s efforts to imitate life by mechanical means—and are fascinating examples of the intersection of art and science.

MONA | Museum of Neon Art (Glendale, California)

The museum re-opens in their new location in Glendale, California on February 6, 2016

In June of 2011, MONA closed its downtown facility to relocate to a new home in the city of Glendale. MONA will serve as the anchor for Glendale’s new Cultural Arts District which will span from Colorado Boulevard on the south to the Alex Theater on the north. Designed by the Shimoda Design Group, the building’s focal point is the dynamic glass light box and the soaring iconic Diver sign perched atop it that will become a landmark on Brand Boulevard

216 S. Brand Blvd.
Glendale, CA 91209

The Bay Lights (San Francisco, California)

baylights

Update: The Bay Lights will return and be permanently re-lit on January 30, 2016 – hold the date!

The Bay Lights went dark on the evening of March 5, 2015 and are scheduled to return in 2016. Here were the evening send-off festivities:

March 5, 7:30 p.m.: The first 1,000 people to arrive at the patio behind Waterbar (399 The Embarcadero, San Francisco) will receive an LED tea light. Gifted by Illuminate the Arts in appreciation of public support for The Bay Lights, the tea lights will continue to glow while the artwork is removed for bridge maintenance and serve as a reminder that the darkness is only temporary. Artist Leo Villareal and Illuminate the Arts Chief Visionary Officer Ben Davis will speak at 8 p.m.

Lights on the Bay Bridge are lit at dusk each night and patterns are algorithmically generated. The motion is quite beautiful and always changes. My favorite spot is to walk south of the Ferry Building at the end of Market Street out on the pier or along Embarcadero toward the giant bow and arrow sculpture. There are also boat tours which I always thought would be beautiful as well.

The Bay Lights is a site-specific monumental light sculpture and art installation on the western span of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge, designed to commemorate the 75th anniversary of its opening. The installation by light artist Leo Villareal includes 25,000 individual white LEDs along 1.8 miles (2.9 km) of the cables on the north side of the suspension span of the bridge between Yerba Buena Island and San Francisco. The installation is controlled via a computer and displays changing patterns that are not meant to repeat. The opening ceremony was held on March 5, 2013.[1] Initially intended as a temporary installation to end on March 5, 2015, the project is now seeking donations and funding to make the display a permanent feature. (Wikipedia)

http://illuminatethearts.org/projects/the-bay-lights/

http://thebaylights.org/