Tag Archives: USA

New Museum 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience (New York City)

This third iteration of the Triennial is titled “Surround Audience” and will feature fifty-one artists and artist collectives from over twenty-five countries; for many of the participants, this will be their first inclusion in a museum exhibition in the United States.

The exhibition encompasses a variety of artistic practices, including sound, dance, comedy, poetry, installation, sculpture, painting, video, and one online talk show. If there is any aesthetic link between these diverse works it is in their energetic mutability of form. Together, these works speak to a newfound elasticity in our understanding of what mediums constitute contemporary art. Here, paintings evolve out of 3-D models, digital images erupt into sculpture, and sound becomes action. This is a group of works that attests to how form is continuously converted across word, image, and medium.

Lynn Hershman Leeson presents an afternoon on the Future of Humanity

With Karen Archey; Oron Catts; Melissa Logan (Chicks on Speed); Patricia Maloney; Luke Massella; Aimee Mullins; Keith Murphy; Anicka Yi; and NASA scientist Dr. Josiah P. Zayner

The future is now. To most people recent scientific progress reads like a pulp sci-fi novel: a teenager in the UK has managed to clone himself, human bodies merge with implanted computer chips and the military developed a technology to print organic skin for victims of war.

For decades, artist Lynn Hershman Leeson has followed technological and scientific progress and its effects on our lives. For Sunday Sessions she presents an afternoon with artists, musicians and scientists who have firsthand knowledge of innovations in biomedical engineering to explore what their experiences reveal about our possible futures.

In an era of programmable DNA when human organs can be printed and banked, limbs regenerated and new life forms created daily, who will have the power to make decisions that affect us all? Will wealth alone determine who benefits from biological engineering? What will it mean to be human?

Enhancement or extinction? To Hershman Leeson there is still a choice.

‘Bubble Over Green’ installation by Victoria Fu (Baltimore, Maryland)

Installation view (23-second excerpt of 20-minute variable loop), Velvet Peel 2, 2015, two-channel projection, sound from Victoria Fu on Vimeo.

Victoria Fu’s installation, Bubble Over Green, is a multilayered audio-visual experience in the former KAGRO building located at 101 W North Avenue in Baltimore’s Station North Arts & Entertainment District. The exhibition consists of moving images projected onto architectural surfaces, aligning the physical site with the space and textures of digital post-production.

Expanding Fu’s previous work addressing the virtual space of cinema, Bubble Over Green references our habituated haptic engagement with the digital image and touchscreen. The multi-channel video and neon installations depict performing bodies interacting with layers of digital effects. Actions based on touchscreen gestures and dynamics are translated into multiple, mediated, and sculptural contexts.Bubble Over Green features performers Polina Akhmetzyanova and Matilda Lidberg with sequences filmed in Sweden in May 2014 with funding from Art Matters Foundation.

http://www.victoriafu.com/

Lights on Tampa 2015 (Tampa, Florida)

The City of Tampa announces the seven art installations chosen to be exhibited in Tampa during Lights on Tampa 2015, which will be held in and around Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park in downtown Tampa on February 20-21, 2015.

Since its inception in 2006, Lights On Tampa has, through either direct involvement or influence, created an ambiance in downtown Tampa. Over $2.5 million in private development has been invested into Tampa’s downtown for permanent light-based art work.

Artwork chosen for Lights on Tampa 2015 is diverse, engaging, and multi-disciplinary, using new technologies, music, dance, and the literary arts.

Nick Cave will be at Lights on Tampa!

Nick Cave – Chicago – Internationally recognized performance artist and sculptor Nick Cave is bringing a herd of thirty colorful life-size horses to Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park. HEARD is a magical, choreographed performance that brings local dancers and musicians together, some in costume and accompanied by live music and captures both light and the imagination. HEARD performances will take place at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. each night, accompanied by rayzilla’s Adjustable Music Monsters performing original music composed / arranged by Tampa-based musician, Ray “rayzilla” Villadonga, featuring excerpts from Keith Hedger’s Dervish. Kicking off the invasion on Friday, February 20th will be the Distinguished Men of Brass. http://nickcaveart.com/Main/Intro.html and example: http://creativetime.org/projects/heard-ny/

See the rest of the line-up at:

http://www.lightsontampa.org/content/lights-tampa-2015

3D Floating Head above Center Bar in SLS Las Vegas (Las Vegas, Nevada)

The incredible display is in fact not an actual golden god, nor is it a projection-mapped, moving physical creation. Instead, the exhibit is a very clever optical illusion, using 2.1 million multicolor LEDs placed in a box structure to create a three-dimensional appearance when viewed from just the right angle.

http://makezine.com/2015/01/30/this-giant-floating-face-creepily-watches-while-you-gamble/

http://www.daktronics.com/news/Pages/SLS-Las-Vegas-Features-Dynamic-Daktronics-LED-Video-Spectaculars.aspx

Discovery Wall at Weill Cornell Medical College (New York City)

A Hirsch&Mann & Squint/Opera collaboration.

In collaboration with Squint/Opera, we designed and built “The Discovery Wall” – a permanent digital artwork created from thousands of tiny screens and lenses that forms the centrepiece of a major new biomedical research centre recently opened in New York City. This piece celebrates the work being delivered in this new research centre by displaying a potentially infinite collections of dynamically changing content at street level.

Our intention was to draw people deeply into the content, and give a sense of the fascinating and important research being conducted inside the purpose-built research facility. To that end, we designed The Discovery Wall to offer viewers three distinct positions to engage with the artwork: from across the street there is a macro view – a large scale image that can be a huge resolution image or an animation; outside the window, the viewers will see the mezzo content – titles of research areas and clusters of hundreds or thousands of images; and, by standing right in front of the artwork, viewers can discover the final, micro view – high resolution images and paragraphs of text related to the area of research visible from the mezzo and macro positions.

http://www.hirschandmann.com/2014/discovery-wall-weill-cornell-medical-college/

Weill Cornell Medical College
1300 York Avenue
New York, NY 10065

The Art of Video Games (Norfolk, Virginia)

The Chrysler presents an exhibition that does more than trace 40 years of creative artistry and technological advances in digital entertainment. It poses the question of whether video games deserve to be considered art.

The show, organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, traces five eras of progress, each with four categories of games. Consider it a story arc that starts with Space Invaders on an Atari, progresses to The Legend of Zelda on a Nintendo, and evolves to the graphically rich epics now available on PlayStation and other platforms.

This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good (New York City, NY)

This exhibition takes its title from the Twitter message that British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee (inventor of the World Wide Web) used to light up the stadium at the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremonies. His buoyant tweet highlighted the way that the Internet—perhaps the most radical social design experiment of the last quarter century—has created limitless possibilities for the discovery, sharing, and expansion of knowledge and information. As we revel in this abundant possibility, we sometimes forget that new technologies are not inherently democratic. Is design in the digital age—so often simply assumed to be for the greater good—truly for everyone? From initial exploratory experiments to complex, and often contested, hybrid digital-analog states, all the way to “universal” designs, This Is for Everyone explores this question with works from MoMA’s collection that celebrate the promise—and occasional flipside—of contemporary design.

Panopticon at UMOCA (Salt Lake City, Utah)

Visibility, Data, and the Monitoring Gaze

Panopticon meaning to observe (-opticon) all (pan-), is a metaphor encapsulating the numerous forms of surveillance used to watch and normalize social behavior. This exhibition investigates systems of observation utilized to record our daily lives through the deployment of both physical and invisible panoptic structures.

ARTISTS

Shin Seung Back and Kim Yong Hun, Erik Brunvand, Mahwish Chishty, Paolo Cirio, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Willie Doherty, Constant Dullaart, Pablo Garcia, Adam Harvey, Leopold Kessler, Jonas Lund, Kate McQuillen, Trevor Paglen, Evan Roth, Addie Wagenknecht

Hello Lamp Post Austin Interactive Art (Austin, Texas)

Hello Lamp Post – Austin from PAN Studio on Vimeo.

Austin’s street furniture is waking up and wants to talk to you.

Hello Lamp Post brings to life the hidden stories of Austin by finding out what the street furniture has to say. Get talking to familiar objects around the city using text messages.

For 10 weeks only everyday things will come to life. Text the official Hello Lamp Post phone number to find out what they have to say.

Created by London based Pan Studio, the project has been commissioned by the City of Austin Cultural Arts Division of the Economic Development Department in celebration of the Art in Public Places program’s 30th anniversary year, and in partnership with Art Alliance Austin.