Tag Archives: Singapore

River Nights 2016 (Singapore)

River Nights 2016 is returning for its third consecutive year to celebrate Empress Place as a creative playground for both artists and visitors. Organised by the Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) and in collaboration with National Arts Council as the principal partner, this year’s theme of “Phantasmagoria” will inspire and delight through four nights of magic and illusion. Join in the fun with the massive 200-person Umbrella Project, a technological collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Pilobolus, immerse yourself in the Soundscape of the River, blending poetry, spoken words, dance, opera, and drum beats, and witness the first ever Noh play performance with 3D projection in the world.

What is Not Visible is Not Invisible (Singapore)

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What is Not Visible is Not Invisible, 2008. Julien Discrit (Photo Frac Lorraine © Galerie Martine Aboucaya, Paris)

Imagine walking into the National Museum of Singapore and being confronted by outdoor environments such as a mound of lush grass, or a beach inviting you for a tan? How about unexpectedly having artwork appear in front and around you, or actually being part of the final puzzle piece to an installation? These are among the experiences visitors will encounter at What Is Visible Is Not Invisible – Featuring selected artworks from the French Regional Collections of Contemporary Art (FRAC), the latest contemporary art exhibition at the National Museum of Singapore, and a parallel project of the Singapore Biennale 2016.

What Is Not Visible Is Not Invisible presents over 30 artworks by French and international artists from FRAC, one of the most important public collection of contemporary art founded in 1982 and anchored by 23 institutions across all the regions in France. The show is curated in collaboration with Platform1, the network of FRACs, and marks the first time that this selection of the collection is being presented in Asia Pacific.

What is Not Visible is Not Invisible broadly surveys the imaginary and the temporary, and takes visitors on an experiential and progressive journey of the mind and senses through the artworks specially selected from FRAC’s collection of 26,000 works. Through the use of unconventional approaches in art-making, the exhibition of multi-media installations invites new ways of perception and brings each visitor into a new state of mind through personal interpretations of the presentations, its surrounding space, and context.

The artworks in What is Not Visible is Not Invisible are curated to encourage audience interaction, and to leave room for personal interpretation. Many of the artworks call for the audience and the environment to play a key role in the artwork and its presentation.

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Repulse Bay, 1999. Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster – Collection FRAC Languedoc-Roussillon © National Museum of Singapore

i Light Marina Bay 2016 (Singapore)

i Light Marina Bay 2016

7.30pm to 11pm daily (Extension to 12mn on Fridays and Saturdays)
Marina Bay Waterfront Promenade
Free Admission

i Light Marina Bay, Asia’s leading sustainable light art festival, returns in its fourth edition to illuminate Singapore’s iconic Marina Bay. This year, more than 20 innovative and sustainable light art installations from Singapore and around the world are set to transform the vibrant waterfront precinct into a kaleidoscopic display of light, colour, shadow and play.

Beyond its spectacular showcase of visual art and urban space, the festival offers a dynamic line-up of events and programmes over four weekends. With fun boat tours, eclectic performances, delectable outdoor dining options, engaging artist workshops and more, i Light Marina Bay 2016 presents a multi-sensory experience with something for all.

Betwixt Festival 2016 (Singapore)

Betwixt: Art & Bytes – Inaugural festival

As our social landscape swiftly becomes more and more digitalised, new mediums of expression emerge entwined in technology. Coding and physical computing have become tools for artists to create art that has an interactive nature to it, art that requires stimulation and participation to be art – in summary, digital, interactive art.

Betwixt Festival attends to this form of art, a form that becomes art in the presence of the human element through interaction, thereby humanising digital technology. It aims to demystify the art form and strengthen the community of digital, interactive art makers through its three-day exhibition, an academic symposium, lectures and masterclasses, performances and screenings.

‘Raising Spirits and Restoring Souls’ by Zul Mahmod (Singapore)

Commissioned by the Singapore Art Museum

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5 Stars: Art Reflects on Peace, Justice, Equality, Democracy and Progress is the Singapore Art Museum’s (SAM) salute to Singapore’s Golden Jubilee and the five stars on the Singapore flag, which represent universal humanist values.

RAISING SPIRITS AND RESTORING SOULS. from zul mahmod on Vimeo.

Along a maze of copper pipes that hug the walls, wrapping around the gallery space, a staccato, metronomic orchestra of clinks and twangs tap out the rhythms of a melody that seems all too familiar, yet somehow eludes immediate recognition. The sounds are produced by solenoid valves and e-bows, devices which activate when an electromagnetic current runs through them, while pre-recorded singing issues forth from the speakers. Zulkifle’s Raising Spirits and Restoring Souls draws upon and reimagines Singapore’s national anthem, Majulah Singapura (Onward Singapore), and in the process, much of the song has been distilled to its percussive beat. Composed by Zubir Said in 1958, Majulah Singapura – which is sung daily by every school child in Singapore – contains the phrase “Sama-sama menuju bahagia”, which translates as, “Let us progress towards happiness together”. This sentence was of particular interest to Zulkifle, and in examining the idea of ‘Progress’ and what it signifies to Singaporeans from across the social and economic spectrum, the artist collaborated with children from disadvantaged backgrounds to record their vocal rendition of the phrase, and this is the only line that is ‘sung’ in the sound installation. Zulkifle asks, “Does the song really resonate with Singaporeans? What is progress in this context? Most of us believe that progress is a linear path; perhaps it is anything but.”

ArtScience Late (August 2015) at Marina Bay Sands (Singapore)

One Thursday a month, from 7pm – 10pm at ArtScience Museum

Supercodex [live set]

20 August 2015, 8pm

Concept & composition: Ryoji Ikeda
Computer graphics & programming: Tomonaga Tokuyama

Sonic artist, visual artist, electronic composer and computer-musician in one, Ryoji Ikeda has gained international renown for his provocative work combining visuals and sound.

Supercodex [live set] reworks musical concepts from Ikeda’s 2013 superposition piece, which investigates how we understand the reality of nature on an atomic scale, taking its starting point in mathematical models and quantum mechanics. From a subtle beginning consisting of digital noise, blips and bass drones, there gradually emerges the core elements of techno and dance music, where Ikeda uses raw data and mathematical models to generate music and projections.

Don’t miss this extraordinary live performance, where the accompanying visuals add to the rich textures to merge the senses, creating an unforgettable experience. Prepare to be immersed in a multi-sensorial extravaganza.

For more information: http://www.ryojiikeda.com/archive/concerts/#supercodex_live_set

ArtScience Late (July 2015) at Marina Bay Sands (Singapore)

One Thursday a month, from 7pm – 10pm at ArtScience Museum

2015:time:space:

featuring Robert Casteels, Dirk Johan Stromberg and Andrew Thomas

9 July 2015, 7.30pm & 9pm

This collaborative work for voice, electronic instrument, live processing, tape and video presents two new electronic instruments – the Sphere and the Strombophone – which accompany captivating scenes from nature to Singapore’s metropolis, crossing time and space.

ArtScience Late (May 2015) at Marina Bay Sands (Singapore)

One Thursday a month, from 7pm – 10pm at ArtScience Museum

PV868

7 May 2015, 8pm and 9pm

Set your mind free through PV868, an experimental audiovisual performance created by NUS/ArtScience Museum Residency artist TeZ. Experience the hypnotic effect of moving visual patterns, emerging directly from the interaction between the brainwaves and the sound and light stimulation, unique to each participant.

ArtScience Late (March 2015) at Marina Bay Sands (Singapore)

One Thursday a month, 7pm – 10pm, at the ArtScience Museum

2015:time:space:
featuring Robert Casteels, Dirk Johan Stromberg and Andrew Thomas
26 March 2015, 8pm and 9pm

This collaborative work for voice, electronic instrument, live processing, tape and video presents two new electronic instruments – the Sphere and the Strombophone – which accompany captivating scenes from nature to Singapore’s metropolis, crossing time and space.

Original production generously supported by the National Arts Council.

ArtScience Late (Feb 2015) at Marina Bay Sands (Singapore)

One Thursday a month, 7pm – 10pm, at the ArtScience Museum

The Orchestra of Futurist Noise Intoners
directed by Luciano Chessa, A Performa commission
12 February 2015, 7:30pm and 8:45pm

Inspired by Leonardo da Vinci’s mechanical noisemakers, Futurist painter and composer Luigi Russolo (1885–1947) developed an orchestra of hand-cranked instruments which he called Intonarumori. These first mechanical synthesizers produced by Russolo generated sounds of whirrs and buzzes, clangs, scrapes, sirens and mechanically plucked strings. In collaboration with the Italian Cultural Institute and Performa, ArtScience Museum presents two full performances by The Orchestra of Futurist Noise Intoners, an ensemble founded in 2009 by the Italian composer and conductor Luciano Chessa that performs on his replicas of Russolo’s earliest Intonarumori orchestra. Each performance will be accompanied by a short talk by Chessa.