Tag Archives: San Francisco

After Dark Thursdays at the Exploratorium (San Francisco)

The Exploratorium is located at Pier 15 in San Francisco, California.

Due to the overwhelming popularity of our monthly After Dark events, we’ve expanded our Thursday evening programs. We’re now open every Thursday night to adults 18 and over; each week we offer a different program to stimulate your senses and expand your mind. Delicious nibbles and outrageous bay views are available at the SeaGlass restaurant, and cash bars offer libations of all kinds. Come for the cocktails, stay for the exhibits, and indulge in endless exploration.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/thursday-nights

Visit Autodesk Gallery at One Market in San Francisco

Come by to explore hands-on exhibits that show how people use technology to imagine, design, and create a better world. Open Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. A guided tour begins at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays.

Location
Located near the San Francisco Ferry Building and one block from the Embarcadero Station for BART and Muni, the Autodesk Gallery is easily accessible by public transportation.

Autodesk Gallery at One Market
One Market, Floor 2
San Francisco, CA 94105

Hours
Wednesdays:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Guided tour at 12:30 p.m.

Fridays:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

http://www.autodesk.com/gallery/visit-us

ButterflyWall by Charles Sowers at San Francisco Airport (SFO) in Terminal 2

Butterfly Wall consists of 20 hand-cranked mechanical butterflies that are propelled up a cable to gently flutter back down again in a delightful random choreography dictated by the air resistance of their spinning dichroic wings. When the cranks are not being used, a programed set of movements activates the butterflies.

ButterflyWall from Charles Sowers on Vimeo.

There is also a smaller version near the entrance at the Exploratorium in San Francisco.

http://charlessowers.com/

Musical Stairs by Remo Saraceni at Pier 39 Fisherman’s Wharf (San Francisco)

musicalstairspier39

Musical Stairs are an art initiative that increases physical activity and builds social connection within the communities.

Musical stairs and Big Piano are present in more than 1.000 Children’s Museums, Discovery Center, Science Center, City Subway, Shopping Centre, Music Museums and Children’s Hospital. We have partnered with people around the world to touch more lives with this rare innovation. Musical stairs will continue to influence people positively and more lives will be touched in time to come.

http://www.pier39.com/home/attractions/on-the-pier/musical-stairs/

http://www.musicalstairs.com/

The Interval at Long Now at Fort Mason Center (San Francisco)

intervallongnow

A bar, cafe, museum, and the home of The Long Now Foundation.

Come enjoy coffee or cocktails surrounded by books floor-to-ceiling and mechanical wonders from a clock engineered to last 10,000 years. Featuring Brian Eno’s music and his ambient painting—a continuously evolving, never-repeating work of art. An inspiring venue for great conversations and delicious drinks.

Located in San Francisco’s historic Fort Mason Center within sight of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz.

http://theinterval.org/

Eric Staller’s SpiroGyrate in Terminal 3 at San Francisco Airport (SFO)

Commissioned by the San Francisco Arts Commission, SpiroGyrate is an interactive children’s play area in Terminal 3 of San Francisco International Airport.

Twelve 56″ (142 cm) spirals mesh and seemingly propel one another like so many gears, in an installation that begins on the floor and moves up the wall. Each of these spirals is laser-cut acrylic and each of them is motorized to move clockwise and counter-clockwise in a slow and hypnotic fashion. The piece is interactive, beginning with the viewer’s ability to walk and stand on the spirals, which are under heavy glass plates. Motion sensors respond to people walking over the glass circles and activate color changes in the back-lit spirals.

Fabrication: Rocket Science;interactivity consultant: Tobias Grosse-Puppendahl, Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD

http://ericstaller.com/commissioned%20work/SPIROGYRATE/

Sweepers Clock by Maarten Baas (San Francisco)

Is on display at The Exploratorium in San Francisco, California.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/arts/works/sweepers-clock

Maarten Baas combines theater, art, film, and design in Sweeper’s Clock to make a 12-hour-long movie in which two performers replicate an analog clock by sweeping two piles of garbage (one for the hour hand, one for the minute hand) to indicate the time.

http://www.maartenbaas.com/

Sweeper Clock by Maarten Baas from Dezeen on Vimeo.

The Bay Lights (San Francisco, California)

baylights

Update: The Bay Lights will return and be permanently re-lit on January 30, 2016 – hold the date!

The Bay Lights went dark on the evening of March 5, 2015 and are scheduled to return in 2016. Here were the evening send-off festivities:

March 5, 7:30 p.m.: The first 1,000 people to arrive at the patio behind Waterbar (399 The Embarcadero, San Francisco) will receive an LED tea light. Gifted by Illuminate the Arts in appreciation of public support for The Bay Lights, the tea lights will continue to glow while the artwork is removed for bridge maintenance and serve as a reminder that the darkness is only temporary. Artist Leo Villareal and Illuminate the Arts Chief Visionary Officer Ben Davis will speak at 8 p.m.

Lights on the Bay Bridge are lit at dusk each night and patterns are algorithmically generated. The motion is quite beautiful and always changes. My favorite spot is to walk south of the Ferry Building at the end of Market Street out on the pier or along Embarcadero toward the giant bow and arrow sculpture. There are also boat tours which I always thought would be beautiful as well.

The Bay Lights is a site-specific monumental light sculpture and art installation on the western span of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge, designed to commemorate the 75th anniversary of its opening. The installation by light artist Leo Villareal includes 25,000 individual white LEDs along 1.8 miles (2.9 km) of the cables on the north side of the suspension span of the bridge between Yerba Buena Island and San Francisco. The installation is controlled via a computer and displays changing patterns that are not meant to repeat. The opening ceremony was held on March 5, 2013.[1] Initially intended as a temporary installation to end on March 5, 2015, the project is now seeking donations and funding to make the display a permanent feature. (Wikipedia)

http://illuminatethearts.org/projects/the-bay-lights/

http://thebaylights.org/