Tag Archives: New York

The Strong – National Museum of Play (Rochester, New York)

The Strong is the only collections-based museum in the world devoted solely to play. It is home to the International Center for the History of Electronic Games, the National Toy Hall of Fame, the World Video Game Hall of Fame, the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play, the Woodbury School, and the American Journal of Play and houses the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of historical materials related to play. Known widely as the nation’s museum of play, The Strong blends the best features of both history museums (extensive collections) and children’s museums (high interactivity) to explore the ways in which play encourages learning, creativity, and discovery and illuminates cultural history.

http://www.museumofplay.org/

The Strong
One Manhattan Square
Rochester, NY 14607

What’s On at EMPAC, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, New York)

If you are near Troy, New York, check out up-to-date activities at the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC).


http://empac.rpi.edu/events/2015/spring?type=talk

Just two and a half hours north of New York City via a beautiful train ride up the Hudson River, an easy day trip from the Berkshires or Saratoga Springs, and across the river and just north of Albany, NY. We are also just under three hours by car from Boston or Montreal.

On the campus of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the nation’s oldest technological research university, EMPAC overlooks Troy, a city that played a central role in the Industrial Revolution and that still preserves some of the 19th century’s best architecture.

Bjork Retrospective at MoMA (New York)

The Museum of Modern Art presents a retrospective of the multifaceted work of composer, musician, and singer Björk. The exhibition draws from more than 20 years of the artist’s daring and innovative projects and her eight full-length albums to chronicle her career through sound, film, visuals, instruments, objects, and costumes. In the Museum lobby, instruments used on Biophilia (2011)—a gameleste, pipe organ, gravity harp, and Tesla coil—play songs from the album at different points throughout the day. On the second floor, in the Marron Atrium, two spaces have been constructed: one is dedicated to a new sound and video installation, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, for “Black Lake,” a song from Björk’s new album Vulnicura (2015); and the second is a cinema room that screens a retrospective in music videos, from Debut (1993) to Biophilia. On the third floor, Songlines presents an interactive, location-based audio experience through Björk’s albums, with a biographical narrative that is both personal and poetic, written by the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón, along with many visuals, objects, and costumes, including the robots designed by Chris Cunningham for the “All Is Full of Love” music video, Marjan Pejowski’s Swan Dress (2001), and Iris van Herpen’s Biophilia tour dress (2013), among many others.

Moving Image 2015 Video Art Fair (New York City)

From March 5 to 8, Moving Image New York will take over the Waterfront Tunnel on 11th Avenue between 27th and 28th Streets in Chelsea. It will include more than 30 exhibitors from the U.S. and around the world—several from Brazil and a few from Finland—and five works will have their world premieres at the fair.


http://observer.com/2015/02/moving-image-new-york-the-chilled-out-art-fair-you-didnt-know-you-needed/

In addition, one video from the fair will participate in Midnight Moment and have nightly screenings on electronic billboards in Times Square for month of April 2015.

Anicka Yi: You Can Call Me F at The Kitchen (New York City, NY)

For You Can Call Me F, The Kitchen’s gallery will function as a forensic site in which the artist aligns society’s growing paranoia around contagion and hygiene (both public and private) with the enduring patriarchal fear of feminism and potency of female networks. Anicka Yi’s new works will gather biological information from one hundred women to cultivate the idea of the female figure as a viral pathogen, which undergoes external attempts to be contained and neutralized. Employing the visual language of quarantine tents, which allow limited transparency and access while aiming to protect their fragile ecosystems within, Yi’s humanist approach foregrounds the politics and subjectivities of smell, and its impact on our empathic understanding of each other.

More information
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/20/anicka-yi-the-kitchen_n_6904596.html

New Museum 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience (New York City)

This third iteration of the Triennial is titled “Surround Audience” and will feature fifty-one artists and artist collectives from over twenty-five countries; for many of the participants, this will be their first inclusion in a museum exhibition in the United States.

The exhibition encompasses a variety of artistic practices, including sound, dance, comedy, poetry, installation, sculpture, painting, video, and one online talk show. If there is any aesthetic link between these diverse works it is in their energetic mutability of form. Together, these works speak to a newfound elasticity in our understanding of what mediums constitute contemporary art. Here, paintings evolve out of 3-D models, digital images erupt into sculpture, and sound becomes action. This is a group of works that attests to how form is continuously converted across word, image, and medium.

Lynn Hershman Leeson presents an afternoon on the Future of Humanity

With Karen Archey; Oron Catts; Melissa Logan (Chicks on Speed); Patricia Maloney; Luke Massella; Aimee Mullins; Keith Murphy; Anicka Yi; and NASA scientist Dr. Josiah P. Zayner

The future is now. To most people recent scientific progress reads like a pulp sci-fi novel: a teenager in the UK has managed to clone himself, human bodies merge with implanted computer chips and the military developed a technology to print organic skin for victims of war.

For decades, artist Lynn Hershman Leeson has followed technological and scientific progress and its effects on our lives. For Sunday Sessions she presents an afternoon with artists, musicians and scientists who have firsthand knowledge of innovations in biomedical engineering to explore what their experiences reveal about our possible futures.

In an era of programmable DNA when human organs can be printed and banked, limbs regenerated and new life forms created daily, who will have the power to make decisions that affect us all? Will wealth alone determine who benefits from biological engineering? What will it mean to be human?

Enhancement or extinction? To Hershman Leeson there is still a choice.

Discovery Wall at Weill Cornell Medical College (New York City)

A Hirsch&Mann & Squint/Opera collaboration.

In collaboration with Squint/Opera, we designed and built “The Discovery Wall” – a permanent digital artwork created from thousands of tiny screens and lenses that forms the centrepiece of a major new biomedical research centre recently opened in New York City. This piece celebrates the work being delivered in this new research centre by displaying a potentially infinite collections of dynamically changing content at street level.

Our intention was to draw people deeply into the content, and give a sense of the fascinating and important research being conducted inside the purpose-built research facility. To that end, we designed The Discovery Wall to offer viewers three distinct positions to engage with the artwork: from across the street there is a macro view – a large scale image that can be a huge resolution image or an animation; outside the window, the viewers will see the mezzo content – titles of research areas and clusters of hundreds or thousands of images; and, by standing right in front of the artwork, viewers can discover the final, micro view – high resolution images and paragraphs of text related to the area of research visible from the mezzo and macro positions.

http://www.hirschandmann.com/2014/discovery-wall-weill-cornell-medical-college/

Weill Cornell Medical College
1300 York Avenue
New York, NY 10065

This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good (New York City, NY)

This exhibition takes its title from the Twitter message that British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee (inventor of the World Wide Web) used to light up the stadium at the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremonies. His buoyant tweet highlighted the way that the Internet—perhaps the most radical social design experiment of the last quarter century—has created limitless possibilities for the discovery, sharing, and expansion of knowledge and information. As we revel in this abundant possibility, we sometimes forget that new technologies are not inherently democratic. Is design in the digital age—so often simply assumed to be for the greater good—truly for everyone? From initial exploratory experiments to complex, and often contested, hybrid digital-analog states, all the way to “universal” designs, This Is for Everyone explores this question with works from MoMA’s collection that celebrate the promise—and occasional flipside—of contemporary design.

Heartbeat by Stereotank is the 2015 Times Square Valentine Heart (New York City)

Brooklyn-based design studio Stereotank’s design was selected for the 2015 Times Square Valentine Heart. Times Square Alliance partnered with The Architectural League of New York and invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2015 competition, the distinguished Selection Panel selected Stereotank’s HeartBeat out of seven design proposals.

This engagement sculpture consists of a massive heart glowing to the rhythm of a strong, deep and low frequency heartbeat sound and visitors are encouraged to move around and engage with it by playing various percussion instruments. The audience is invited to come together and creatively play, listen, dance and feel the vibrations of the heart while enjoying the warm pulsating light. The unveiling will include a short speaking program, followed by the opening of the installation.

In the emblematic and relentless atmosphere of Times Square HeartBeat orchestrates multiple rhythms into a unique urban concert.