Please Touch the Art by Jeppe Hein (Brooklyn, New York)

Public Art Fund announces Please Touch the Art, a major new exhibition by Danish artist Jeppe Hein featuring 18 playful sculptures designed specifically for public interaction at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Engaging visitors through pieces that are both accessible and surprising, the show includes three distinct bodies of work: Appearing Rooms, a series of “rooms” formed when water shoots up from the work’s gridded base forming “walls” that appear and disappear throughout the day; a large new Mirror Labyrinth, featuring equidistantly spaced vertical elements at varying heights made from mirror-polished stainless steel that multiply the surrounding landscape through myriad reflections; and 16 new Modified Social Benches that upend the idea of a traditional park bench with their unconventional angled, curved, twisted, and bent forms. The most comprehensive exhibition of his work ever presented in public space in the United States, Jeppe Hein: Please Touch the Art is on view May 17, 2015 – April 17, 2016 at Brooklyn Bridge Park.

On view throughout the space, Please Touch the Art extends from just south of the Manhattan Bridge down along the waterfront to Pier 6.

Daniel Rozin: Descent With Modification (New York City, New York)

bitforms gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition with Israeli-American artist Daniel Rozin. “Descent With Modification” marks his first display of interactive sculpture at the Lower East Side location, and his seventh solo exhibition at bitforms gallery, since 2002. Merging the geometric with the participatory, Rozin’s installations have long been celebrated for their kinetic and interactive properties. Grounded in gestures of the body, the mirror is a central theme of Rozin’s practice. In his art, surface transformation becomes a means to explore animated behavior, representation, and illusion.

The exhibition features six installations that are shaped by Darwin’s breakthrough writings on evolutionary biology, particularly “On The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection” from 1859. Marked by a new visual emphasis on the mechanism of descent with modification, Rozin’s works are algorithmically based on the randomness of genetic drift. The pieces also use humor as they synthesize notions of the wild with image complexity, pattern, and dynamic behavior. As a group, they further Rozin’s longstanding investigation of modernist principles, and probe the terrain of artificial life.

Central to the exhibit are four software art installations that Rozin developed over a period of five years. In these works, programmed “evolutionary pressure” pushes the artworks to resemble the viewer’s mirrored image. Engaging the viewer with interactive response, each piece positions the site of the audience differently, and varies the formal properties of line, luminosity, and tempo, as screen-based pictures are built improvisationally.


The largest work in the exhibition, Penguins Mirror is an installation scattered on the floor and comprised of 450 motorized stuffed animals. Reductive in palette, yet baroque in behavior, it performs an absurdly homogeneous system of movement. Playing with the compositional possibilities of black and white, each penguin turns from side to side and responds to the presence of an audience. As they perform, the penguins’ collective intelligence is puzzling, yet somehow familiar, as the plush toys enact a precise choreography rooted in geometry.


PomPom Mirror is similarly anthropomorphic, and features a synchronized array of 928 spherical faux fur puffs. Organized into a three-dimensional grid of beige and black, the sculpture is controlled by hundreds of motors that build silhouettes of viewers using computer-vision. Along its surface, figures appear as fluffy animal-like representations within the picture plane, which is made permeable by a ‘push-pull’ forward and backward motion of meshed ‘pixels’. Ghostly traces fade and emerge, as the motorized composition hums in unified movement, seemingly alive and breathing as a body of its own.

The screens for this exhibition have been provided by PLANAR.

FACETS Creative Un-Conference 2015 (Brooklyn, New York)

An interdisciplinary creative coding, interactive art, and videogames un-conference.

FACETS is a conversational based creative un-conference with a focus on underrepresented voices and demographics in STEM and art.

FACETS grew out out of a need for a new type of conference and a new type of conversation. Art, interactive technology, new media and game design are making innovative, beautiful things and are using similar tools and having similar, ground breaking discoveries and conversations but not with each other. What can a game designer learn from the linear mathematics used from procedurally generated music? What can the new media academic teach the creative technologist? How does technology inform storytelling, and how will video game design change cinema? The aim of FACETS is to create a cross disciplinary conference that facilitates conversation, mentorship, innovation, and ideation across these disciplines. We all make amazing things, let’s make them together.

F5 Festival 2015 (New York City)

F5 is a creativity festival exploring the intersection of design, art & technology.

F5 brings together the thinkers and doers that are breaking ground and shaping new standards in media and design. It’s an essential meeting point for future-minded individuals with the power to create lasting change.

The two-day festival gathers filmmakers, writers, digital artists, game designers, interactive artists, motionographers, graphic designers, visual effects experts, musicians, industry visionaries and many more.

3D Printshow (New York City)

Cutting-edge 3D printing showcase and conference.

Alongside the incredible showfloor filled with the biggest names and the hottest tech in 3D printing, our New York show will be aimed at (and feature incredible work from) a new generation of designers, creators, makers and artists – in short, it will be a show filled with creative flair.

For education and inspiration, our workshops and seminars rooms will be filled with some of the worlds top 3D printing speakers and our classroom will allow our younger visitors from schools and colleges to understand how this tech is transforming design and manufacture.

3D Printshow New York features will include:

Kitchen
Art Gallery
Fashion & Jewellery House
Home
Knowledge Bar
Lab (Your chance to get hands-on experience)
Skyline

Emil Schult: Portrait of a Media Artist Pioneer (Buffalo, New York)

Artist Emil Schult is a painter, poet, and musician best known for his work with electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk. While studying with Dieter Rot, Joseph Beuys and Gerhard Richter at Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf, he was invited to contribute to the band’s visual and musical ideas. This collaboration with founders Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider led to Schult’s creating lyrics as well as graphic designs for their album covers and creating images of the musical instruments and electronic sounds that were being crafted by the group for performances and recordings.

Schult’s designs include the covers of the albums Ralf & Florian, Autobahn, Radioactivity, Trans Europe Express, and Computer World. He also provided projections of his artwork that are still used in Kraftwerk concerts today.

In 2012, Schult was invited to be an artist in residence at the Institute for Electronic Arts at Alfred (N.Y.) University. Since then, he has been a frequent visitor and lecturer at Alfred while creating new work at the Institute.

This exhibition explores the depth of Schult’s career in visual and sonic art. It includes hand cut prints of early computer chips; Reverse Glass Portraits of electronic music luminaries Robert Moog, John Cage, Clara Rockmore, Oskar Sala, and others; a sound installation based on Charles Burchfield’s work and the concept of synesthesia; and ceramic sound sculptures created in Germany. In the fall of 2014 Schult worked with students at the institute for Electronic Arts to create The Sounds of Charles Burchfield, an examination of the role of synesthesia in the painter’s work. Schult instructed participants to analyze the structural and rhythmic elements of the images and re-create them with his “reverse glass painting” technique. Audio files were then created with Photosounder software to allow viewers to literally “hear” the paintings. The end results will be part of the exhibition in the Budin Gallery.

The Strong – National Museum of Play (Rochester, New York)

The Strong is the only collections-based museum in the world devoted solely to play. It is home to the International Center for the History of Electronic Games, the National Toy Hall of Fame, the World Video Game Hall of Fame, the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play, the Woodbury School, and the American Journal of Play and houses the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of historical materials related to play. Known widely as the nation’s museum of play, The Strong blends the best features of both history museums (extensive collections) and children’s museums (high interactivity) to explore the ways in which play encourages learning, creativity, and discovery and illuminates cultural history.

http://www.museumofplay.org/

The Strong
One Manhattan Square
Rochester, NY 14607

What’s On at EMPAC, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, New York)

If you are near Troy, New York, check out up-to-date activities at the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC).


http://empac.rpi.edu/events/2015/spring?type=talk

Just two and a half hours north of New York City via a beautiful train ride up the Hudson River, an easy day trip from the Berkshires or Saratoga Springs, and across the river and just north of Albany, NY. We are also just under three hours by car from Boston or Montreal.

On the campus of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the nation’s oldest technological research university, EMPAC overlooks Troy, a city that played a central role in the Industrial Revolution and that still preserves some of the 19th century’s best architecture.

Bjork Retrospective at MoMA (New York)

The Museum of Modern Art presents a retrospective of the multifaceted work of composer, musician, and singer Björk. The exhibition draws from more than 20 years of the artist’s daring and innovative projects and her eight full-length albums to chronicle her career through sound, film, visuals, instruments, objects, and costumes. In the Museum lobby, instruments used on Biophilia (2011)—a gameleste, pipe organ, gravity harp, and Tesla coil—play songs from the album at different points throughout the day. On the second floor, in the Marron Atrium, two spaces have been constructed: one is dedicated to a new sound and video installation, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, for “Black Lake,” a song from Björk’s new album Vulnicura (2015); and the second is a cinema room that screens a retrospective in music videos, from Debut (1993) to Biophilia. On the third floor, Songlines presents an interactive, location-based audio experience through Björk’s albums, with a biographical narrative that is both personal and poetic, written by the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón, along with many visuals, objects, and costumes, including the robots designed by Chris Cunningham for the “All Is Full of Love” music video, Marjan Pejowski’s Swan Dress (2001), and Iris van Herpen’s Biophilia tour dress (2013), among many others.