Survival Research Laboratories Inconsiderate fantasies of negative acceleration characterized by sacrifices of a non-consensual nature (New York City)

Marlborough Contemporary, New York is pleased (and slightly nervous) to present Inconsiderate Fantasies of Negative Acceleration Characterized by Sacrifices of a Non-Consensual Nature by the legendary Survival Research Laboratories. The exhibition, the first solo presentation by SRL in a commercial gallery, comprises eight kinetic sculptures dating from 1986 to the present, along with video documentation of past performances in which these machines were engaged

Arising from San Francisco’s emergent technological revolution in the late 1970’s, SRL—an amorphous crew of indeterminate number led by the visionary Mark Pauline—can be seen to represent a robust counterpoint to the convenience app and frictionless capitalism that Silicon Valley has enabled. While the tech sector has naturally moved toward smaller, faster and cleaner Pauline has maintained a visceral, humanized vision of machines. His robots are built from raw and battered steel and lurch, shudder and smash rather than gliding effortlessly. They are inefficient and fallible, and sacrifice themselves as readily as they destroy.

Historically, the machines have been made from purloined and available materials (“Obtanium” in SRL parlance) beginning with simple bottling automation mechanics from a defunct brewery and extending to Oculus Rift. The Spine Robot, a trunk-like appendage with a claw and whose hyper-articulated movement is enabled by of-the-moment carbon fiber cable, is operated remotely and can grasp objects with a surprising delicacy.

Other works eschew technological nitpicking for sheer displays of power. The Pitching Machine, for example, employs a 500 cubic-inch Cadillac Eldorado engine, linked to a sequence of spinning tires, that is capable of hurling a standard two-by-four at speeds up to 200 miles per hour. Violence and danger are materials in Pauline’s work, and fear is often a reasonable response. The artist and viewer collectively amplifying and refracting the American Way.

Already a hero in the global counterculture, and an inspiration to generations of influential thinkers from William Gibson to WIRED Magazine, Mark Pauline has been historically less visible within the art world. This exhibition aims to emphasize the raw power and beauty of the sculptures as objects that we can now safely inspect. Here, their intricate, complex construction and menacing design is temporarily in repose, while daring to dream of roaming a respectable sculpture park near you.

Culturehub: Visions of the Future III (New York City)

Hyphen Hub returns for its third year of extraordinary and otherworldly performances that showcase radical new visions of the future from around the world. Featuring the U.S. premieres of cYcle by Montreal’s QUADr who make audiovisual magic on bicycle wheels, and SWARM by Bogota-based collective Attractor. The evening will also feature Dutch Fashion-Tech designer Anouk Wipprecht who combines fashion and technology with interactive creations.

Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 (New York City)

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound (New York City)

Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound presents the work of ten artists who use light, digital projection, and experimental media to reflect on their place in and between traditional and dominant cultures. Through innovative sound art, digital media, and installation, the exhibition demonstrates the continuity of Indigenous cultures and creativity in the digital age. The artists use nontraditional media and colorful and dynamic forms to draw viewers into a world of indigenous experience, insight, and invention that is at once ancient and adapted to the moment.

Artists featured in Transformer include Jordan Bennett (Mi’kmaq), Raven Chacon (Diné), Jon Corbett (Métis), Marcella Ernest (Ojibwe), Stephen Foster (Haida), Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit), Julie Nagam (Anishnawbe/Métis), Marianne Nicolson (Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw), Keli Mashburn (Osage), and Kevin McKenzie (Cree/Métis). The project is curated by Kathleen Ash-Milby (Diné), National Museum of the American Indian, and David Garneau (Métis), University of Regina; an illustrated booklet accompanies the exhibition.

FoST Fest 2017 – The Future of Storytelling Festival (Staten Island, New York)

Come be a part of a gathering unlike any other! The FoST Festival is an immersive storytelling festival that puts you at the center of the action. Delight in interactive, multisensory exhibits, take in awe-inspiring live performances, try out cutting-edge new technologies, and learn from some of the smartest people from the worlds of entertainment, marketing, and technology about where storytelling is headed in the future.

Sonic Arcade: Shaping Space with Sound (New York City)

Sonic Arcade: Shaping Space with Sound is a multi-component exhibition featuring interactive installations, immersive environments, and performing objects that explore how the ephemeral and abstract nature of sound is made material. At a time when so much visual information is being dispatched, consumed, and digested, the auditory provides a compelling sensory experience that is capable of reorienting the body to consider spatial and interpersonal relationships anew.

Comprised of linked solo and curated projects, Sonic Arcade explores sound as substance, framing it as interdependent material that is physically crafted and transmitted through electronic circuits and signals, radio waves, and resonant bodies that create encounters that are not only heard, but felt. The exhibition features contemporary artists, designers, and performers who respond to sound’s potential as a material that influences how people experience space, their environment, and time, drawing out the ability of the auditory to provide a fresh perspective on how surroundings, and the body, are perceived and engaged.

Sonic Arcade features solo projects by Arjen Noordeman and Christie Wright, Louise Foo and Martha Skou, MSHR, Julianne Swartz, Naama Tsabar, and Studio PSK, whose project incorporates on-site residency and activation by New York–based choreographers. In addition, Sonic Arcade includes two nested exhibitions: the first, curated by Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe, features commissions by Emily Counts and Make Noise; the second, curated by Radius, comprises off-site, site-specific commissions by Deborah Stratman and Anna Friz.

The Art of VR (New York City)

Leading artists, directors and producers from NYC and LA, combine with award-winning, curated content exhibitions, featuring the latest in virtual reality that is creating a new, intimate connection with audiences around the world.

Sotheby’s, in partnership with the VR Society of Hollywood, invites you to a one-of-a-kind, exclusive opportunity to see and experience this new world for yourself and for your organization. It’s a glimpse of the future that is… “more than meets the eye.”

Leo Villareal at Pace Gallery (New York City)

Pace Gallery is pleased to present the gallery’s first solo exhibition by New York-based light artist Leo Villareal, featuring all new works. Blurring the lines between LED and projections, Villareal uses modern technology to create an ethereal experience for the viewer. According to the artist, “Art is a distillation of ideas into material through which artists communicate. For me, art has always served as a portal – something that takes the viewer to another place.” On view from May 4 through August 11, 2017, at 537 West 24th Street, Leo Villareal is the first presentation of new works by Villareal since his project Current was commissioned by the London-based Illuminated River Foundation to light the bridges of the River Thames.

Anish Kapoor: Descension at Brooklyn Bridge Park (Brooklyn, New York)

It’s coming to the US!

Considered one the most influential artists working today, Anish Kapoor (b. 1954, Mumbai, India) works in a wide variety of scales and formats, and in a range of media including pigment, stone, stainless steel, resin, wax, earth, and most recently, silicone. Over the last four decades, he has created a remarkably inventive and resonant body of work layered with artistic, cultural, and personal associations. Anish Kapoor: Descension brings one of Kapoor’s most viscerally arresting installations yet to New York for the first time. Creating a dynamic negative space that descends into the ground, Descension is a massive spiraling funnel that harnesses the evanescent material of water. Disturbing the familiar boundaries of our world whilst pushing the limits of materials, the work invites visitors to experience the sheer wonder of intense perception, in a quintessential New York park.

Rhizome Seven on Seven 2017 (New York City)

Rhizome’s Seven on Seven is an annual conference that brings together leaders in art and technology and challenges them to make something new. Founded by Rhizome in 2010, Seven on Seven forefronts leading issues at the intersection of culture and technology, and animates them through its novel format. Seven leading artists are paired with seven visionary technologists and asked to “make something”: an artwork, a prototype, a provocation—whatever they imagine. What they create in their short time together premieres at the conference, yet its effects ripple beyond that day.

The 2017 edition features artists and technologists asking timely questions about how new technologies organize publics and public space. The line-up includes founders of international media organizations, corporate and civic leaders, artists blurring the lines between art and entrepreneurship, and creators pushing new technologies—from WeChat to artificial intelligence to the fabric of the web itself—to their furthest ends.

Seven on Seven 2017 will feature:
Artist Jayson Musson & Jonah Peretti, Founder and CEO, Buzzfeed
Artist collective and NEW INC resident DIS & Rachel Haot, Managing Director, 1776
Artist Bunny Rogers & Nozlee Samadzadeh, Engineer, Vox
Artist Olia Lialina & Mike Tyka, artificial intelligence researcher at Google
Artist Addie Wagenknecht & Cindy Gallop, Founder, MakeLoveNotPorn and IfWeRanTheWorld
Artist Constant Dullaart & Chris Paik, Partner, Thrive Capital
Artist Miao Ying & Mehdi Yahyanejad, Founder, Balatarin and Net Freedom Pioneers