Tag Archives: New York City

Anicka Yi: You Can Call Me F at The Kitchen (New York City, NY)

For You Can Call Me F, The Kitchen’s gallery will function as a forensic site in which the artist aligns society’s growing paranoia around contagion and hygiene (both public and private) with the enduring patriarchal fear of feminism and potency of female networks. Anicka Yi’s new works will gather biological information from one hundred women to cultivate the idea of the female figure as a viral pathogen, which undergoes external attempts to be contained and neutralized. Employing the visual language of quarantine tents, which allow limited transparency and access while aiming to protect their fragile ecosystems within, Yi’s humanist approach foregrounds the politics and subjectivities of smell, and its impact on our empathic understanding of each other.

More information
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/20/anicka-yi-the-kitchen_n_6904596.html

New Museum 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience (New York City)

This third iteration of the Triennial is titled “Surround Audience” and will feature fifty-one artists and artist collectives from over twenty-five countries; for many of the participants, this will be their first inclusion in a museum exhibition in the United States.

The exhibition encompasses a variety of artistic practices, including sound, dance, comedy, poetry, installation, sculpture, painting, video, and one online talk show. If there is any aesthetic link between these diverse works it is in their energetic mutability of form. Together, these works speak to a newfound elasticity in our understanding of what mediums constitute contemporary art. Here, paintings evolve out of 3-D models, digital images erupt into sculpture, and sound becomes action. This is a group of works that attests to how form is continuously converted across word, image, and medium.

Discovery Wall at Weill Cornell Medical College (New York City)

A Hirsch&Mann & Squint/Opera collaboration.

In collaboration with Squint/Opera, we designed and built “The Discovery Wall” – a permanent digital artwork created from thousands of tiny screens and lenses that forms the centrepiece of a major new biomedical research centre recently opened in New York City. This piece celebrates the work being delivered in this new research centre by displaying a potentially infinite collections of dynamically changing content at street level.

Our intention was to draw people deeply into the content, and give a sense of the fascinating and important research being conducted inside the purpose-built research facility. To that end, we designed The Discovery Wall to offer viewers three distinct positions to engage with the artwork: from across the street there is a macro view – a large scale image that can be a huge resolution image or an animation; outside the window, the viewers will see the mezzo content – titles of research areas and clusters of hundreds or thousands of images; and, by standing right in front of the artwork, viewers can discover the final, micro view – high resolution images and paragraphs of text related to the area of research visible from the mezzo and macro positions.

http://www.hirschandmann.com/2014/discovery-wall-weill-cornell-medical-college/

Weill Cornell Medical College
1300 York Avenue
New York, NY 10065

This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good (New York City, NY)

This exhibition takes its title from the Twitter message that British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee (inventor of the World Wide Web) used to light up the stadium at the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremonies. His buoyant tweet highlighted the way that the Internet—perhaps the most radical social design experiment of the last quarter century—has created limitless possibilities for the discovery, sharing, and expansion of knowledge and information. As we revel in this abundant possibility, we sometimes forget that new technologies are not inherently democratic. Is design in the digital age—so often simply assumed to be for the greater good—truly for everyone? From initial exploratory experiments to complex, and often contested, hybrid digital-analog states, all the way to “universal” designs, This Is for Everyone explores this question with works from MoMA’s collection that celebrate the promise—and occasional flipside—of contemporary design.

Heartbeat by Stereotank is the 2015 Times Square Valentine Heart (New York City)

Brooklyn-based design studio Stereotank’s design was selected for the 2015 Times Square Valentine Heart. Times Square Alliance partnered with The Architectural League of New York and invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2015 competition, the distinguished Selection Panel selected Stereotank’s HeartBeat out of seven design proposals.

This engagement sculpture consists of a massive heart glowing to the rhythm of a strong, deep and low frequency heartbeat sound and visitors are encouraged to move around and engage with it by playing various percussion instruments. The audience is invited to come together and creatively play, listen, dance and feel the vibrations of the heart while enjoying the warm pulsating light. The unveiling will include a short speaking program, followed by the opening of the installation.

In the emblematic and relentless atmosphere of Times Square HeartBeat orchestrates multiple rhythms into a unique urban concert.

“Volume (Durst)” Leo Villareal Light Installation (New York City)

This sculpture in the lobby of the Durst Organization building at 1133 Sixth Avenue, New York, NY can be seen from outside the building through the large windows facing the plaza. At the time (2013) this was his largest three-dimensional work and it included a total of 86,400 LED lights.

LEO VOLUME (Durst) from James Ewing on Vimeo.

http://villareal.net/

http://www.parallel.nyc/projects/volume-durst/

Midnight Moment in Times Square (New York City)

Midnight Moment is the largest coordinated effort in history by the sign operators in Times Square to display synchronized, cutting-edge creative content on electronic billboards and newspaper kiosks throughout Times Square every night. The program premiered in May 2012 and is organized and supported by the Times Square Advertising Coalition in partnership with Times Square Arts, the public art program for the Times Square Alliance, with additional partners of participating sign holders and artists.

http://www.timessquarenyc.org/times-square-arts/projects/midnight-moment/index.aspx

Robot Swarm at MoMath – The Museum of Mathematics (New York City)

Exhibit opened on December 14, 2014

Don’t miss the public debut of Robot Swarm, MoMath’s new blockbuster exhibit. Interact with two dozen small, glowing robots who react to your presence and communicate with each other, chasing after you or zooming away as you move across the floor. With cutting-edge new developments in motion control and positioning systems, this is the most ambitious robotics exhibit in the nation. Discover why swarm technology is one of the most exciting fields of robotics, as simple mathematical rules bring these robots to life!

http://momath.org/home/robot-swarm/