Tag Archives: Kentucky

Mechanical Horse by Adrian Landon (Lexington, Kentucky)

Oct 2015 – Oct 2016 (estimated start/end dates)

Almost two years in the making, the Mechanical Horse was single-handedly designed, machined and sculpted by me, at home and in my metal shop in Brooklyn, NY. Over 100 bearings, custom laser-cut sprockets, 30 feet of chain, 23 articulating joints and one small electric motor, this has been by far my most challenging project yet, combining my in-depth knowledge and passion for horses, my childhood mechanical experience with Legos, and most of all, my love for creation.

Spoonfall by Ned Kahn at 21c Museum Hotel Louisville (Louisville, Kentucky)

Spoonfall by Ned Kahn from Benjy Young on Vimeo.

Water cascades down clear acrylic spoons arrayed on a 6 by 6 foot ‘wall’ behind the reception desk in Counting House, creating a reflective, multi-sensory experience for diners and visitors alike.

An American artist living and working in Northern California, Ned Kahn says his work is inspired by “atmospheric physics, geology, astronomy and fluid motion. I strive to create artworks that enable viewers to observe and interact with natural processes. I am less interested in creating an alternative reality than I am in capturing, through my art, the mysteriousness of the world around us.

My artworks frequently incorporate flowing water, fog, sand and light to create complex and continually changing systems. Many of these works can be seen as ‘observatories’ in that they frame and enhance our perception of natural phenomena. I am intrigued with the way patterns can emerge when things flow. These patterns are not static objects, they are patterns of behavior – recurring themes in nature.”

http://www.21cmuseumhotels.com/museum/exhibition/9/spoonfall/

21c Museum Hotel Louisville
700 West Main Street
Louisville, KY 40202

Text Rain by Camille Utterback and Romy Achituv at 21c Museum Hotel (Louisville, Kentucky)

textrain9_4543613566_o

Text Rain is an interactive installation in which participants use the familiar instrument of their bodies, to do what seems magical—to lift and play with falling letters that do not really exist. In the Text Rain installation participants stand or move in front of a large projection screen. On the screen they see a mirrored video projection of themselves in black and white, combined with a color animation of falling letters. Like rain or snow, the letters appears to land on participants’ heads and arms. The letters respond to the participants’ motions and can be caught, lifted, and then let fall again.

http://www.21cmuseumhotels.com/louisville/museum/exhibits/text-rain/