Tag Archives: Greenbelt

NASA James Webb Space Telescope Art Exhibit (Greenbelt, Maryland)

NASA announced the opening of a free new art exhibit inspired by the James Webb Space Telescope at the Visitor Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

In November 2016, artists from around the country applied to visit NASA Goddard to see the telescope, with its 6.5-meter-high, gold-coated mirror. Twenty five were selected to bring art supplies with them and be inspired to create in front of Webb, housed inside its massive cleanroom behind a viewing window. The artists represented a broad range of artistic media and styles, including watercolor, 3D printed sculpture, silk screening, acrylics, sumi-e (East Asian brush technique), comics, letterpress, woodwork, metalwork, jewelry making, fiber art, ink, mural painting, kite-making, tattooing, scientific illustration, poetry, songwriting and video.

Visitors can view an exhibit of the resulting artwork at the Goddard Visitor Center from March 3 to April 16, 2017. There is no entry fee for the Visitor’s Center, which is open to the general public.

The Webb telescope, a joint mission between NASA, the European Space Agency and Canadian Space Agency, will study every phase in the history of our Universe, ranging from the first luminous glows after the Big Bang, to the formation of planetary systems capable of supporting life on planets like Earth, to the evolution of our own Solar System and beyond.

Solarium Installation at NASA Goddard’s Space Flight Center – Visitor Center (Greenbelt, Maryland)

The sun’s atmosphere dances. Giant loops swell up over the surface. Waves sweep through. Eruptions of material five, 10, 50 times the size of Earth explode out into space.

Solarium — an innovative new piece of video art — puts you directly in the heart of this mesmerizing show. The art taps into a vast reservoir of imagery from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

SDO watches ultratraviolet light invisible to the naked eye to track how material dances through the solar atmosphere. SDO takes a picture almost once a second — no other solar observatory has ever collected data on the entire sun at the speeds with which SDO does. Each image has eight times as much resolution as an HD TV.

http://www.nasa.gov/solarium/#.VNXHhsaEPu2