Tag Archives: Cambridge

Life in Picoseconds (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Life in Picoseconds, the 23rd experiment at Le Laboratoire, is a collaboration between French design team Millimetre, video artist and scientist Charles Reilly, artist Daniel Faust, artist and researcher Anna Ondaatje, and Le Laboratoire founder David Edwards. Integral to the Life in Picoseconds experience is an extraordinary new form of digital representation, the Atom Screen. With the Atom Screen, still and moving images appear on swirls of particles that move in chaotic and prescribed ways between glass panels, producing unusual, abstract, and realistic representations that convey emotive, artistic, and scientific impressions.

The Atom Screen represents a new impressionistic movement in digital screen technology that departs from the advance of digital screens toward hyper-realistic representation.

In the exhibition, several works by New York-based photographer/artist Daniel Faust, taken from his recent exhibition Silicon in San Jose, California, appear next to a large vertical Atom Screen. These images, depicting starkly poetic moments and visions of Valley reality, appear on the Atom Screen as superpositions on randomly scattered particles that cover fractions of the screen surface, which disintegrate and reconfigure from minute to minute.

Further into the exhibition, a second, larger Atom Screen hangs in the center of the gallery. Particles rush in ceaseless motion and provide a kind of thermal agitation to the original film Life in Picoseconds by Charles Reilly.

Reilly’s film is a molecular simulation of a protein molecule unfolding in the picosecond time-frame of molecular life. Here the Atom Screen provides a more realistic atomistic relief and a here-not-here quantum perspective on the molecular unfolding process. Visitors can walk around the Atom Screen and observe Life in Picoseconds as a positive or negative moving image or sit and experience the entire unfolding process, which lasts around 20 minutes.

Life in Picoseconds is an interdisciplinary exploration of aesthetic representation in the digital medium where the substrate becomes an active partner to the projected digital image, in the way analog materials participated in the abstraction of modern art.

Diffusion Choir Kinetic Sculpture (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Diffusion Choir from Sosolimited on Vimeo.

Diffusion Choir is a kinetic sculpture commissioned by Biomed Realty for its building at 650 East Kendall Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Sosolimited partnered with Plebian Design and Hypersonic to design, program, and fabricate this unique artwork.

The sculpture celebrates the organic beauty of collaboration by visualizing the movements of an invisible flock of birds. Four hundred folding elements form a hanging volume in the sunlit atrium. Each element can independently open and close, controlled by custom software running a flocking algorithm.

The movements of the sculpture are perpetually evolving, driven by the flocking simulation. Over the course of each hour, smaller groups of birds coalesce into a single entity, soaring through the air in fluid collaboration. At each quarter hour, the birds gather and perform special choreographed gestures across the sculpture.

The sculpture reflects the collaborative and innovative spirit of the work happening in the building. The graceful breath-like movements of the piece create an open, contemplative space for all the inhabitants of the building to enjoy.

https://www.sosolimited.com/work/diffusion-choir/

HUBweek 2016 (Boston, Massachusetts)

We’re thrilled to share that HUBweek 2016 will take place this fall from Sunday, September 25 through Saturday, October 1, hosted across Boston, Cambridge and Somerville. This year, three concepts that are critical in fueling our innovation & creative economy will be explored in-depth.

Ideas to impact: Exploring pathways to support and advance early-stage ideas to impact. Fostering ideas that will have a long-term, positive impact on society.

Intersections (in art, science, and technology): Exploring the next digital revolution at the intersection of art, science and technology. Encouraging cross-disciplinary collaborations for cross-disciplinary solutions.

Inclusive innovation: Increasing opportunities for all members of society to be a part of the innovation process. Ensuring that advancements in tech benefit all in society.

Throughout the week, these themes will influence programming, activations and conversations at every level. Five events taking place during HUBweek 2016 have been announced, with many more to come.

Birdly by Max Rheiner Virtual Reality Immersive Experience (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Presented by Swissnex @ Le Laboratoire Cambridge

BIRDLY is an installation which explores the experience of a bird in flight. It captures the mediated flying experience, with several methods. Unlike a common flight simulator you do not control a machine with joysticks, a mouse or thousands of buttons: you intuitively embody a bird, the Red Kite. To evoke this embodiment Birdly mainly relies on sensory-motor coupling. The participant can command the installation with arms and hands which directly correlates to the wings (flapping) and the primary feathers of the bird. Those inputs are reflected in the flight model of the bird and displayed physically by the simulator through nick, roll and heave movements…

Visualised through a Head Mounted Display (HMD) the participant is embedded in a virtual landscape where the users body is the body of a Red Kite. The whole scenery is perceived in the first person perspective of a bird. To intensify the embodiment we include additional sonic, and wind feedback. Soundwise you perceive only the roaring of the wind and the flaps of the wings. According to the speed of the bird the simulator regulates the headwind from a fan mounted infront of the user.

Birdly’s intuitive approach to flying, its full body immersion and the unique combination of custom Hard- and Software are unprecedented until this day.

fashion4wrd: Revealing the Future of Design and Technology (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Join us for an evening exploring how Fashion and Technology will evolve in the next 10 years. Curated by Descience, the kick off of the MITEF Innovation Series and hosted at the MFA. Dress to inspire for an exciting evening at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston where we will reveal the future of design, fashion, science and technology!

The evening will include a world class panel discussion, the Future Lab highlighting game changing start ups, technologies and designs with demo experiences where guests can try new technologies, interact with sponsors, attend spotlight talks in the museum on 3D printing, and more.

Speakers:

Suzanne Lee, Modern Meadow
http://www.modernmeadow.com/

Chris Wawrousek, New Balance, Innovation Studio
http://www.newbalance.com/

Dr. Amanda Parkes, Manufacture New York
http://manufactureny.org/

The 11th Fab Lab Conference, Symposium and Festival (Boston, Massachusetts)

International Fab Lab Network members from more than 450 labs in 55 countries are gathering in August 2015 in the birthplace of the Fab Lab concept. We come together this year to explore how the ability to “Make (almost) Anything” is impacting individuals, communities, businesses and collaborative research and projects from Detroit to Togo, Barcelona to Shanghai and everywhere in between. At Fab11, members will share technical expertise, best practices, and the powerful stories behind Neil Gershenfeld’s statement “The power of Digital Fabrication is social, not technical”.

FAB11 Conference: Aug 3-9, 2015
FAB11 Symposium: Aug 6, 2015
FAB11 Festival: Aug 8-9, 2015

MIT Museum: Images of Discovery (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

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Photographers, image makers, and innovators Felice Frankel, Harold “Doc” Edgerton, and Berenice Abbott are featured in this new exhibition at the MIT Museum. While working at MIT, each photographer explored a range of scientific questions.

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Berenice Abbott

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Harold “Doc” Edgerton

By using strobes, magnification, and other light-capturing strategies, they reveal their curiosity about the natural world and how it works. Visitors will learn more about using photography to examine the unknown through their exposure to these distinguished photographers, and the unique image making stations featuring the inventive methodologies used by Edgerton, Abbott and Frankel.

The work selected showcases the photographer’s curiosity and dedication to making the natural and the technological world more accessible to the public. Each are represented by over ten images that range in subject matter from swinging wrenches to soap bubbles.

Images of Discovery presents an exciting opportunity for visitors to experience photography as a tool for communicating about—and inspiring a passion for—science and technology.

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MIT Museum: Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Arthur Ganson’s kinetic sculptures are a special feature of the MIT Museum.

Press a pedal or turn a crank and you’ll put Ganson’s machines into motion. Take the artist’s invitation: “The objects are part of a cycle. I take an idea from my heart, but it is not complete until you have seen it, and found your own meaning in it.”

His sculptures explore the nature of oiled surfaces, object manipulation and slow explosions, and are created from a range of materials that he fabricates or finds.

http://web.mit.edu/museum/exhibitions/ganson.html

MIT Museum
265 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139

Knotty Objects: brick, bitcoin, steak, phone | MIT Media Lab (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

ICA Boston and MIT Media Lab

This July, we will explore the apertures and entanglements between and across design and technology.

The first MIT Media Lab Summit devoted to design, Knotty Objects will gather designers, scientists, engineers, makers, writers, curators, and scholars around the discussion of four complex and omnipresent objects, along with the rich stories they can tell. The objects–brick, bitcoin, steak, and phone–will become lenses through which we examine the transdisciplinary nature of contemporary design.

The MIT Media Lab’s antidisciplinary approach to research positions it to interrogate design and technology’s relationship: the tensions; their affinities and entanglements; their closeness and distance.

Together, the event’s speakers will tackle concepts and products; prototypes and series; manufacturing and construction methods and their relationship with tradition and material culture; designing with bricks, circuits, and cells; and imagining a future that is based on science and fueled by design.

We invite you to join us for a night and a day of discussion on a future that embraces the ambivalence, ambiguity, and the great potential of disciplines coming together to form new dimensions.