Vespers by Neri Oxman and her team at Design Museum (London, England)

‘Vespers’ is the latest addition to Stratasys’ ‘The New Ancient’ collection and will be unveiled at the ‘Fear and Love’ exhibition at London’s Design Museum (24 November 2016 – 23 April 2017)

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VESPERS, Mask 5, Series 2, 2016. Designed by Neri Oxman and her team as part of “The New Ancient” Collection by STRATASYS and 3D Printed on a Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer. Photo credit: Danielle van Zadelhoff

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VESPERS, Mask 3, Series 2, 2016. Designed by Neri Oxman and her team as part of “The New Ancient” Collection by STRATASYS and 3D Printed on a Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer. Photo credit: Yoram Reshef

– Stratasys (Nasdaq:SSYS), the 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions company, today announces the official launch of ‘The New Ancient’ 3D printed art and design collection. The collection includes ‘Vespers’, a series of exploratory 3D printed death masks, designed by Neri Oxman and her team, which will be unveiled to the public at the grand reopening of London’s Design Museum next week. Oxman combines design and computation to produce the masks which, in a landmark breakthrough, emulate the resolution and complexity that is usually only found in nature.

Oxman, along with her team members – Christoph Bader, Dominik Kolb, Rachel Smith, and Sunanda Sharma of the Mediated Matter Group – led the creation of Vespers. Comprising 15 masks in three sub-series, Vespers portrays the past, present and future, and explores the themes of past worlds and future technologies. “Made of a single material, such as wax or plaster, the death mask has historically originated as a means of capturing a person’s visage, keeping the deceased ‘alive’ through memory,” explains Oxman. “Vespers’ death masks, however, are designed to reveal cultural heritage and speculate about the perpetuation of life, both cultural and biological.”

“Vespers’ designs are entirely data driven, digitally generated, 3D printed, and – at times – biologically augmented,” Oxman continues. “By pushing the boundaries of cusp technologies – such as high-resolution material modelling, full color multi-material 3D printing, and synthetic biology – they express the death mask’s deeper meanings and possible future use, thus bringing it back to life.”

Rebirth is embodied in the third sub-series of masks, called ‘Future’. Perhaps the most ground-breaking of the trilogy, the final sub-series engages with synthetic biology to explore whether the death mask can drive the formation of new life, repositioning the objects as habitats capable of interfacing with living microorganisms. Devoid of cultural expressions and nearly colorless, the final five masks ‘re-engineer’ life by guiding living microorganisms through minute spatial features of the artefacts.

“The Vespers masks were photographed by Belgian photographer, Danielle van Zadelhoff, whose particular photography style characteristic of Chiaroscuro is reminiscent of Caravaggio and Rembrandt – resonating with the theme of timelessness as portrayed throughout the series,” explains Kaempfer.

http://matter.media.mit.edu/

http://www.stratasys.com/

https://designmuseum.org/exhibitions/future-exhibitions/fear-and-love

Design Museum
224-238 Kensington High Street
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