Matthew Rosier’s 108 Steps (Macclesfield, England)

October 26-28, 2018

Matthew Rosier's 108 Steps from FutureEverything on Vimeo.

The 108 Steps, a winding stairway between the Macclesfield station and the town centre, are a beloved local landmark for Maxonians.

Over three nights in October, passersby can see the Steps brought to life by artist Matthew Rosier who has captured ‘a week in the life’ on film, to create a wistful and atmospheric projection-mapped installation.

Earlier this year, Matthew Rosier visited Macclesfield to capture the daily life of the town’s iconic steps. Filmed footage of local runners, commuters, dog walkers – and everyone in between – has been composed into a loop of memories, which will be projected onto the face of the steps (and people using them). The work creates interplay between past and present, bringing to life the Steps’ historic connection to people and place.

Believed to date from 1696 when the local newspaper nicknamed the cobbled climb ‘The Steps’, no one knows exactly when they were created.

https://matthewrosier.uk/108-Steps

Tough Art 2018 at Pittsburgh Children’s Museum (Pennsylvania)

On exhibit through January 2019.

This innovative artist residency program challenges artists and audiences to rethink their ideas of interactive museum experiences in one of the toughest venues – a children’s museum.

Tough Art 2018 Artists are:

Isaac Levine, Lake Light
Lake Light is a kinetic sculpture that uses LED lights and ping pong balls propelled back and forth by fans to simulate the lights and sounds of moonlight bouncing on lake water. See new things in repetitive patterns!

Miranda Miller and Lumi Barron, Light Showers
Inspired by the joy of finding rainbows in the spray from a garden hose, Light Showers encourages visitors to create their own mist fall and discover the hidden rainbows that float within it.

Neil Mendoza, Mechanical Masterpieces
Mechanical Masterpieces is a gallery of classical art reimagined for the 21st century. Viewers can poke, switch, disco, inflate and water paintings to their heart’s content.

https://www.facebook.com/pittsburghkids/videos/240175563325951/

https://pittsburghkids.org/exhibits/tough-art

MOD. Museum (Adelaide, Australia)

MOD. at the University of South Australia is a futuristic museum of discovery, a place to be and be inspired.

With dynamic, changing exhibition programs, MOD. inspires young adults aged 15+ about science and technology, showcasing how research shapes our understanding of the world to inform the future.

For visitors, MOD. is a free science experience like no other. A tourist icon bringing together the general public, researchers, students and industry to interact, learn and be inspired – MOD. is Australia’s boldest, and South Australia’s only, interactive public science and creativity space.

MOD. offers seven purpose-built gallery areas over two floors, a cafe, shop, and lecture theatre, housed within the University’s new Health Innovation Building on Adelaide’s cultural boulevard on North Terrace. It features Australia’s first Science on a Sphere, a room-sized display that shows planetary data on a sphere surrounded by touchscreens.

MOD. presents an ambitious annual program including two seasonal exhibitions as well as talks, workshops and special events.

https://mod.org.au/

Sweeper’s Clock by Maarten Baas at The Exploratorium (San Francisco, California)

Sweeper Clock by Maarten Baas from Dezeen on Vimeo.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/arts/works/sweepers-clock

Maarten Baas combines theater, art, film, and design in Sweeper’s Clock to make a 12-hour-long movie in which two performers replicate an analog clock by sweeping two piles of garbage (one for the hour hand, one for the minute hand) to indicate the time.

http://www.maartenbaas.com/

Eric Staller’s SpiroGyrate in Terminal 3 at San Francisco Airport (SFO)

Commissioned by the San Francisco Arts Commission, SpiroGyrate is an interactive children’s play area in Terminal 3 of San Francisco International Airport.

Twelve 56″ (142 cm) spirals mesh and seemingly propel one another like so many gears, in an installation that begins on the floor and moves up the wall. Each of these spirals is laser-cut acrylic and each of them is motorized to move clockwise and counter-clockwise in a slow and hypnotic fashion. The piece is interactive, beginning with the viewer’s ability to walk and stand on the spirals, which are under heavy glass plates. Motion sensors respond to people walking over the glass circles and activate color changes in the back-lit spirals.

http://ericstaller.com/commissioned%20work/SPIROGYRATE/

“Kinetic Rain” Sculpture at Changi Airport Singapore

The world’s largest kinetic sculpture is in the Departure-Check-in Hall of Terminal 1 at Singapore Airport.

“Kinetic Rain” Changi Airport Singapore from ART+COM on Vimeo.

In the course of refurbishment works ART+COM was commissioned to create a signature art installation for the Departure-Check-in hall of Terminal 1 at Singapore Airport. “Kinetic Rain” is composed of two parts, each consisting of 608 rain droplets made of lightweight aluminum covered with copper. Suspended from thin steel ropes above the two opposing escalators, each droplet is moved precisely and seemingly floating by a computer-controlled motor hidden in the halls ceiling. The drops follow a 15-minute, computationally designed choreography where the two parts move together in unison, sometimes mirroring, sometimes complementing, and sometimes responding to each other.

http://www.changiairport.com/en/airport-experience/attractions-and-services/kinetic-rain.html

Butterfly Wall by Charles Sowers at San Francisco Airport (SFO) in Terminal 2

Butterfly Wall consists of 20 hand-cranked mechanical butterflies that are propelled up a cable to gently flutter back down again in a delightful random choreography dictated by the air resistance of their spinning dichroic wings. When the cranks are not being used, a programed set of movements activates the butterflies.

ButterflyWall from Charles Sowers on Vimeo.

There is also a smaller version near the entrance at the Exploratorium in San Francisco.

http://charlessowers.com/

The Vine Arm at the National Museum of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland)

This beautiful botanical prosthetic arm was designed by Sophie de Oliveira Barata for model Kelly Knox.

The Alternative Limb Project was founded by Sophie de Oliveira Barata to create prosthetic limbs which are highly stylised art pieces. Sophie seeks to create prosthetics which embody the wearer’s personality and represent their interests. She originally began making hyper-realistic prosthetics, until an eight-year-old client became the inspiration for the Alternative Limb Project. Her client wanted images of her favourite cartoon characters on her prosthetic and Sophie happily obliged. Since then she has created prosthetics inspired by everything from disco balls to video games.

https://www.nms.ac.uk/vine